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Founded in 1924

NATIONAL KWr?:Wm CO”" NY, INC

GEMER, LiESARY

‘SERVICE

Radio Television

FM

Communications

2400 California Street, N. W.

Washington 8, D. C.

Robert

D. Heinl, Editor

INDEX TO ISSUE OF JULY 2, 1947

HECEIVEU JUL 7 mi

NUB1 1RAMMEU.

Pearson Blasts FCC Nominee; Rep. Jones Denies Klan Charge . 1

Son of Bond Geddes, RMA Vice-President, Killed In Auto Crash . 3

"Many Will See Washington For 1st Time By TV" - Trammell . 4

WRC-FM Broadcast Station Begins Operations .

Schuette Reported On The High Road Following Hospitai Siege’. !!!!!’.

British Commonwealth Circuits Argument Set For August 8

Ralph Atlass Applies For $200,000 TV Station For Chicago!..;*.!!!!;

NAB Changes Network Membership From Active to Associate .

Six Companies Oppose Press Wireless .

Congressional Inquiry Demands Petrillo Appear July 7 . 9

Sen. White Throws Up Sponge For Radio Bill . . . 10

Merle Jones Returns To CBS As General Manager Of WCCO. .!’.!!..!.! 10

Surplus Walkie-Talkies Can't Be Used For Citizens Radio . 11

Fcrt Industry Enters Detroit Through WJ3K In $700,000 Deal . 12

CBS Sued For $250,000 . . . . .,...12

RCA Opens Radio-Telegraph Circuit To Greece . 12

Scissors And Paste

Trade Notes

No. 1781

15

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July 2, 1947

PEARSON BLASTS FCC NOMINEE - REP. JONES DENIES KLAN CHARGE

As a follow-up in his fight against the confirmation of Representative Robert F. Jones ( R) , of Ohio, FCC nominee, Drew Pearson, ABC radio commentator, has sent Senator Wallace White of Maine, an affidavit from Glenn E. Webb, an Ohio labor leader, that Webb, former head of the Black Legion, said to be the successor of the Ku Klux Klan, had initiated Representative Jones into the Legion.

Despite this latest move on the part of Mr. Pearson, friends of Representative Jones, still seemed confident that the Ohio Congressman would be confirmed when the subcommittee meets tomorrow (July 3) to further consider the matter.

The Webb affidavit follows:

"I, Glenn E. Webb, hereby being duly sworn, swear on oath that I initiated Robert F. Jones into the Black Legion on the Tapscott Farm, east of Lima, Ohio. Robert Jones kneeled before me where I could see him face to face - with a gun at his back accord¬ ing to our ritual as he accepted the oath of obligation. The cere¬ mony took place around 1935. "

The affidavit was labelled by the Ohio Congressman "a most vicious and malicious lie” in a statement given to Robert C. Barton, Managing Editor of the Lima News. Barton quoted Representative Jones as saying that Webb, a member of the Executive Board of the Lima local of the CIO United Electrical Workers, was attempting to "destroy a person whom he could not control in public life".

Mr. Jones declared the CIO had "spent an estimated $25,000" in an attempt to defeat him in the last election.

The Lima News Managing Editor said Webb signed the affida¬ vit in the presence of him and Robert Waldron, another member of the News* staff. He said the form of the affidavit was dictated over the telephone by Drew Pearson.

Mr. Pearson testifying before asubcommittee of the Senate Interstate Commerce Committee, of which Senator Brewster (r), of Maine is Chairman, had e xpressed doubt that Representative Jones, nominated to succeed Ray C. Wakefield on the Federal Communications Commission, would, as an FCC member, give him (Pearson) and his associates a fair hearing on their application for a Baltimore radio station license. He said he based the statement on "evidence" from Jones1 own Lima, Ohio, district.

Representative Jones, he said, "has been personally ident¬ ified with one of the most anti-Semitic, Fascist-inclined figures in this country - namely, Gerald L. K. Smith. "

Helnl Radio News Service

7/2/47

Furthermore, he said, while he had no personal knowledge that Jones was a Klansman, his Information was that the Congressman’s father in the early 20’ s had introduced his son to others as nthe youngest member of the Ku Klux Klan. "

"I regret to make the even more serious charge that the evidence I have received ... is that he was a member of an equally bigoted organization - anti- Catholic and anti- Jewish - namely the Black Legion.

Representative Jones called these statements ’’unmitigated lies”. In a recent column, Drew Pearson charged that Mr. Wakefield was dropped after he voted to reject a radio station application from Robert Bartley, a nephew of House Democratic Leader Sam Rayburn of Texas,

The Congressman said he understood that Rayburn had sponsor¬ ed him, probably along with other Democrats as well as Republicans.

Mr. Pearson said Wakefield also voted against an applica¬ tion for a Cincinnati radio station which had been filed by Leonard Reinsch, the Present’ s radio coach.

"But I don’t know if that had anything to do with it or not”, he mused.

Mr. Pearson’s letter to Senator White, Chairman of the Senate Interstate Commerce Committee, follows:

"Enclosed is a sworn affidavit from Mr. Virgil H. Ef finger, former head of the Black Legion, relative to the membership of Representative Robert F. Jones of Ohio in that organization.

"I am further informed that Mr. Jones’ induction ceremony into the Black Legion took place on the Tapscott Farm on the Eell- fontain Road near the Erie Railroad outside of Lima and was admin¬ istered to Congressman Jones by Glenn E. Webb, of Lima, at that time a member of the initiation crew of the Black Legion. Mr. Webb is available as a witness and the Senate of the United States would be remiss in its duty if it failed to cross-examine him.

"The files of the United States Senate Committee on Labor and Education, and the Subcommittee on Civil Liberties, headed by your former colleague, Senator LaFollette of Wisconsin, contain documentary evidence of the anti-Semitic, anti- Catholic, anti-Negro, and anti-labor activities of the Black Legion in Ohio and Michigan a few years ago. At a time when the government of the United States through the executive branch and the Congress is placing the most rigid type of 'loyalty' controls on even the lowest government clerks, I feci it imperative that equally deliberate scrutiny be e.iven to candidates for positions on so high a quasi- judicial body as the Federal Communications Commission,

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nI therefore strongly urge that your committee ask the Federal Bureau of Investigation to make a very careful study of the full facts and circumstances surrounding Mr. Jones* connections with the notorious Black Legion as well as a study of the affili¬ ations and connections Jones maintained with the notorious rabble- rouser Geralk L. K. Smith. The Senate which is now being called upon to vote twenty-five million dollars for loyalty investigations owes it t o the nation to spend a few hundred dollars on the study of a man whose hands will be given a grasp over millions of dollars worth of utilities and the priceless heritage of our free speech,

"Evidence already placed before your subcommittee con¬ sidering the Jones appointment discloses that one convicted sedition- ist, W illiara Dudley pelley, and two indicted alleged seditionists found Mr. Jones* consistent isolationish speeches and voting record both before and after pearl Harbor so attuned to their own views that the Congressman was quoted frequently and enthusiastically by the se merchants of hate.

"In view of the aforementioned, I respectfully submit that the Senate of the United States would be derelict in its duty if it failed to give the most careful consideration to the character and background of Mr. Jones before voting his confirmation to a Commis¬ sion which safeguards our basic freedoms on the nation* s airwaves. **

xxxxxxxxxx

SON OF BOND GEDDES, RMA VICE-PRESIDENT, KILLED IN AUTO CRASH

Gail G. Geddes, 3 2 years old, a member of the staff of the National Association of Manufacturers in New York, and son of Bond P. Geddes, Executive Vice-President of the Radio Manufacturers* Associ¬ ation in Washington, was killed Saturday afternoon when two cars collided about 8 miles from Doylestown, Pa. His two daughters,

Carol 4, and Olivia 3, were seriously injured in the crash. Three passengers in the car of Mr. Geddes, John F. Morgan, of Salem, N. J. , and his two sons were also taken to Doylestown Emergency Hospital.

Elmer Frederick, 47, of New Hope, Pa., driver of the other car, and his wife, Dorothy, were treated for minor hurts. He was charged with involuntary manslaughter but released on bail.

Mr. Geddes, who was born in Washington and received his early education here, was graduated with honors from Amos Tuck School of Economics at Dartmouth College, where he was elected to phi Beta Kappa. As a Navy Lieutenant, junior grade, he served in the pacific on the escort carrier Saginaw Bay, participating in five major battles from Coral Sea to Iwo Jima.

In 1940, he married Miss Lucille Carr in Washington. He is also survived by a brother Bruce Geddes, who is with the Columbia Broadcasting System in Washington.

The funeral was held at St. .Albans Episcopal Church in Washington Tuesday, and burial was in Rock Creek Cemetery.

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7/2/47

"MANY WILL SEE WASHINGTON FOR 1ST TIME BY TV", TRAMMELL

Speaking at the dedication of WNBW, the National Broadcast¬ ing Company* s new half million dollar television station in the Nation* s Capital last Friday, Niles Trammell, President of the National Broadcasting Company said:

"From Washington we expect to send across the country the sight and sound of Congress in session, the reports of Government leaders to the people, not to mention the numerous object of histori¬ cal and artistic interest in which this city abounds. Most of the people in the United States will be seeing Washington for the first time when it comes to them by television,

"In my opinion, television is destined to perform a very definite service in our American system of government. For the first time, the candidate for public office will be seen and heard by large numbers of voters - face to face, at close range - in the privacy of their own homes. This will be a wholesome influence in determining the type of elected representatives who will come to this capital and to the capitals of the 48 States.

"Because television will play such an important part in the field of public affairs, the National Broadcasting Company takes great pride in establishing here in Washington the finest and most modern television station that has ever been built up to this time. "

Said Charles R. Denny, Jr., Chairman of the Federal Com¬ munications Commission:

"WNBW is the nation* s eleventh television station. The cities besides Washington and New York which have television stations are Philadelphia, Schenectady, Detroit, Chicago, St. Louis and Los Angeles. Fifty-four additional television stations are under con¬ struction in 38 cities throughout the country. Most of these will be completed and on the air by the middle of next year.

"Last month more than 8,500 sets were produced. This is about the total number of sets we had in the country on V-J Day.

"The Federal Communications Commission has firm confidence in the future of television and will take every step to assist the radio industry in giving the American people the finest television service attainable. "

Losing no time in fulfilling one of the principal object¬ ives mentioned by Mr. Trammell - that of covering Washington - WN^W picked up President Truman by remote control last Sunday when Mr. Truman addressed a meeting of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People at the Lincoln Memorial. This was fed by Coaxial cable to the country* s first television network.

- 4 -

Helnl Radio News Service

7/2/47

Chief Justice Fred M. Vinson, and Attorney General Tom C. Clark headed the list of distinguished guests at the opening of WNEW Friday night at its newly established studios in Wardman Park Hotel. Among others were Senator Arthur Capper, of Kansas, Senator Joseph H. Ball, of Minnesota, Representative Clarence Brown, of Ohio, and Representative Edith Nourse Rogers of Massachusetts.

The Communications Commission was represented by Chairman Charles R, Denny and Commissioners Clifford J. Durr, Rosel H. Hyde,

E. K. Jett, Paul A. Walker and Ray C. Wakefield.

Among NBC higher-ups who came down from New York for the occasion, in addition to Mr* Trammell, were Frank E. Mullen, Vice- President and General Manager, and Orrin E. IXmlap, Director of Advertising, Radio Corporation of America. Also present was F. P. Guthrie, Assistant Vice-President of RCA Communications.

Present also were Eben Ayres, Secretary to President Truman, Representative Bui winkle; Carl Burkland, Manager, WTOP; Senator Homer E. Capehard of Indiana; Martin Co del, Editor of FM Magazine; T.A.M, Craven, Vice-President, Cowles Broadcasting Co.; Representative Robert Grosser, of Ohio; Representative Everett M. Dirksen, of Illinois: Representative James I. Dolliver, of Iowa; Warren B. Francis, President, National Press Club; Earl H. Gammons, Vice President, Columbia Broadcasting System, Washington; Representa¬ tive Leonard W. Hall of New York; William D. Hassett, Secretary to President Truman; Senator Albert W. Hawke s, of New Jersey; Senator Edwin C. Johnson, of Colorado; Representative Robert F. Jones, Ohio, Just nominated by president Truman for the Federal Communications Commission; Senator James ?. Kern, of Missouri; Edward F. McGrady, Vice-president of RCA; Justin Miller, President of the National .Association of Broadcasters; John Callan O’Laughlin, publisher, Army and Navy Journal.

Also Representative John Taber of New York; Sol Taishoff, Editor, Broadcasting Magazine; former Senator Burton K. Wheeler; Senator Alexander Wiley of Wisconsin; A. D. Willard, Jr. , NAB; and Representative Charles A, Wolverton, of New Jersey.

One of the amusing remarks at the opening performance at WN^W was when Attorney General Clark, watching a speaker being tele¬ vised, said: ’’Give that fellow a number and he would be a welcome guest at the FBI. n

WNBW went on the air before its studios were completed and will offer programs originating in New York for the most part until its film projecting facilities and television stage at the Whrdman Park are completed late in the Summer.

Equipment f or t ransmitting is completed. The transmitter, which cost over $65,000, is the first postwar mass production televi¬ sion transmitter built by RCA. Housed in what used to be the Garden Room at Wardman Park Hotel, the transmitter produces a 5-kw picture signal which is boosted to 20.7 kw. as it radiates from the tower. Over © 0 tubes are in use when the transmitter is operating.

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Helnl Radi o News Servi c e

7/2/47

The Washington art galleries and historical point of interests will be used for broadcasts to local viewers and to out- of-town set owners, since New York, Philadelphia and Schenectady will continue to be linked by co-axial cable. The cable owned by the American Telephone & Telegraph Company can handle two televi¬ sion shows at one time - one northbound, the other southbound.

Another cable is now under construction. The two existing local sta¬ tions share use of the cable, as will the other two to come, unless a system of special relay stations is built.

Operation of this new NBC station is expected to boost sales of receiving sets, which range in price from $250 up. Local dealers took full advantage of the occasion to stage intensive sales, including introduction of an RCA Model 641-TV, a $795 instrument com¬ bining television with phonograph, AM, FM and short-wave radio.

Washington has had some television, provided by DuMont* s WTTG, for almost two years. The new NBC station, like WTTG, will operate on a part-time basis. WMAL-TV, the Evening Star ABC station, and a Bamberger station (WOR) will be in operation by the end of the year.

XXXXXXXX

WRC-FM BROADCAST STATION BEGINS OPERATIONS

Simultaneously with the opening of WN3W, the National Broadcasting Company* s television station in Washington last Friday, WRC-FM, NBC’s FM station in the Nation’s Capital began operation.

Both FM and Television signals are radiated from the same 50 foot RCA super turnstile antenna mounted atop the 300 foot tower on the grounds of the Wardmen Park Hotel. The FM transmitter is designed to generate a 3 kilowatt signal, but the eignal radiated from the transmitter tower will be about 15 kw, of effective power. The super turnstile antenna increases the power of both the televi¬ sion and FM signals. WRC-FM can be heard on FM channel 230 at 93.9 megacycle s.

Initially, WRC-FM will operate on a daily six-hour schedule (3 PM to 9 pm) offering a wide choice of musical programs and com¬ prehensive news coverage.

XXXXXXXX

SCHUETTE REPORTED ON THE HIGH ROAD FOLLOWING HOSPITAL SIEGE

Oswald F. Schuette, RCA consultant In Washington, is expect¬ ed to be able to leave Doctors Hospital today (July 2nd) following an operation for hernia. Mr. Schuette* s case was in the competent hands of his brother-in-law Dr. Robert E. Moran, nationally known surgeon of Washington.

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BRITISH COMMONWEALTH CIRCUITS ARGUMENT SET FOR AUGUST 8

The Federal Communications Commission last Saturday announ¬ ced adoption of a proposed report with respect to certain applica¬ tions for direct radiotelegraph circuits between the United States and various places in the British Commonwealth that were filed sub¬ sequent to the Bermuda Telecommunications Agreement of December 1945,

Oral argument on the proposed report is scheduled to be held before the Commission en banc on August 8th,

The report proposes to grant RCA Communications, Inc. , authority to operate circuits on a regular basis with Australia,

New Zealand, India, Greece, Palestine and the Union of South Africa. Mackay Radio and Telegraph Co. would be authorized to serve Saudi Arabia; and Tropical Radio and Telegraph Co. , to serve Jamaica.

Applications of RCAC and Mackay to communicate with Ceylon, Hong Kong and the Malay States (Singapore), and the application of Press Wireless, Inc., to operate a press circuit with Australia, would be dismissed without prejudice, since there has been no indi¬ cation of British readiness to open these circuits.

In the Bermuda Telecommunications Agreement the United States and British Commonwealth governments provided for the opera¬ tion of direct radiotelegraph circuits between the United States and each of the above-mentioned points, subject, in some cases, to the results of traffic studies. Public hearings on the resultant appli¬ cations were held by the Commission in Aoril and August of 1946.

Chairman Denny and Commissioner Jett dissented from the conclusions in the proposed report with respect to granting circuits to RCAC and Mackay, expressing views to the effect that there should be more of a distribution of the circuits as between RCAC and Mackay. Commissioner Webster did not participate.

XXXXXXXX

RALPH ATLASS APPLIES FOR $ 200,000 TV STATION FOR CHICAGO

Keeping right up with the procession - as he has always done since the days Ralph and his brother Les began with a small transmitter kept in a family bureau drawer which developed into WB3M - Ralph L. Atlas s has put in with the Federal Communications Commission an application for a new television station for WIND of Chicago, of which he is president and principal owner.

Mr. Atlas s has requested channel #2 and puts the installa¬ tion costs at approximately $211,000 with monthly operating cost figured at $13,000 and monthly revenues $7,000. When this applica¬ tion is granted, WIND will have the fifth television station in Chicago.

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Heinl Radio News Service

7/ S/47

NAB CHANGES NETWORK MEMBERSHIP FROM ACTIVE TO ASSOCIATE

By a referendum vote of 629 to 28, the membership of the National Association of Broadcasters yesterday (July 1), approved a change of network status in the Association permitting radio chains to hold associate, rather than active, membership in the industry organization. With the change, effective July 1, the four national networks hold simultaneous membership in the Association for the first time.

An immediate effect of the new by-law is the retirement from the Board of Frank M. Russell, Vice-President, NBC, who has served as a Director for 17 years, Frank Stanton, President, CBS and Edgar Kobak, President MBS, who has been sitting with the Board as an observer.

While the Association's new rules do not permit networks to have permanent Board representation, network officials may be invited to sit as observers from time to time. The new by-law does not obviate the possibility of a network employee being elected to serve as a district director, or a director-at-large, through elec¬ tion while standing as a candidate representing a network-owned station.

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SIX COMPANIES OPPOSE PRESS WIRELESS

The application of Press Wireless for permission to trans¬ mit deferred commercial messages among the services it is presently licensed to render its clients, was opposed at Tuesday’s concluding hearing before the Federal Communications Commission by six other carriers as an unjustified invasion of their r espe ctive fields of